Tag Archives: ian mobsby

Second Sunday of Easter: Thomas as an example of mature discipleship

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In this podcast Ian Mobsby explores the story of the disciples in their encounters with the risen Jesus, and in particular the sotry of Thomas.  Rather than being doubting Thomas, the John 20 text suggests that all the disciples doubted the resurrection as part of the process of faith..  Thomas therefore is an example of dscipleship as a process of faith and doubt.  For more information on St Luke’s please see www.stlukespeckham.co.uk.

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Palm Sunday: The Messiah, but not the one they imagined or wanted

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In this podcast Ian Mobsby explores the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jersualem as the Jewish Messiah exept he was not the type of messiah they could imagine or wanted.  This was recorded at the Palm Sunday Morning Eucharist, March 2016.  For more information on St Luke’s please see www.stlukespeckham.co.uk

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The implications of the transfiguration on our discipleship by Ian Mobsby

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In this podcast on Sunday 7th February 2016, Ian Mobsby explores the transfiguration of Jesus as recorded in the Gospel of Luke.  This year we explore the implications of the transfiguration after the season of Epiphany and before the beginning of Lent.  Ian explores the implications of the text on discipleship and the divinity of Jesus.  For more information on St Lukes see www.stlukespeckham.co.uk

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Epiphany One: Living a baptism orientated life as a Christian

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In this podcast on the first Sunday of Epiphany 2016, Ian Mobsby explores the theme of ‘Living the baptism orientated life’ drawing on the Gospel of Luke, and his interepration of the baptism of Jesus.  Luke is different to other gospel writers in that there are no details about the baptism, but a greater concern for what happened afterwards.  For more information on St Luke’s Church and missional communities please see www.stlukespeckham.co.uk

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Christmas 2: Jesus – the paradoxical wild hope for humanity

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In this podcast on the second Sunday of Christmas 2015/16 Ian Mobsby draws on the Gospel of Johnj Chaoter 1 to explore the theme of a Jesus being the Word, the exposed identity of God who in paradox is human and God.  This is the wild hope of Christianity for all humanity. For mote information on the St Luke’s community and resources see www.stlukespeckham.co.uk.

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Christmas One: A Christianity that costs and where often you don’t fit in

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In this podcast on the first Sunday of Christmas 2015/16 Ian Mobsby draws on the Gospel of Luke 2:41-52 and Acts 7.51-60 to explore the theme of a Christianity that costs. In the Acts reading Ian explores the death of Stephen, the first Christian to die for their faith, and also the Luke reading of a young 12 year old Jesus listening and engaging with the Torah in the temple in Jerusalem.  Both these texts suggest that much of the Christian life is not easy, often where we do not fit in with contemporary society.  For mote information on the St Luke’s community and resources see www.stlukespeckham.co.uk.

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Christmas Day: Emmanuel is not the ‘God for them’ but the ‘God with us’

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In this podcast on Christmas Day at St Luke’s Church Peckham Ian Mobsby explores the meaning of ‘Emmanuel’ as ‘God with us’.  Too often in Christianity the story of the birth of Jesus is heard as the story of the God ‘for them’.  This homily explores the generous and scandalous love of God, that seeks to come as a fragile human being for hope for all people.  The paradox of a man coming from God who was truly God and truly human.

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Advent 4: Mary’s Song of Redemptive Revolution

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In this podcast on the fourth Sunday of Advent, 2015, Ian Mobsby explores the context and meaning of Mary’s Song of Redemptive Revolution as recorded in the Gospel of Luke 1.39-45[46-55].  This text commonaly called the Magnificat, is said at Evening Prayer in most Anglican Churches and religious communities.  As such Mary’s vision is deeply political in that it seeks the common good for economic, social and ecological justice.  This not a violent revolution, but a calling for all those who have and have not to come to the table as equal particpants in the Kingdom of God.

 

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